12 Movies So Good You Overlook Major Flaws

Black Panther CGI
Marvel Studios

No matter how much you love a movie, none of them are perfect, and even the best-crafted film will have at least a couple of nitpicky flaws that can’t be fully ignored.

But sometimes, great movies will bring with them considerable baggage in the way of an abundant issue which fans have to overlook in order to fully enjoy. This is where the term “flawed masterpiece” comes from: an ambitious, terrifically crafted film that nevertheless falls short in a few key areas.

No piece of art is perfect, but it’s precisely because the core of these movies is so damn enthralling that you’re able to look past a huge flaw or two that might derail a lesser film…

12. Too Much Exposition, Not Enough Insanity – Inception

Inception Leonardo DiCaprio Ellen Page
Warner Bros.

The “really good, but really flawed” criticism applies to the majority of Christopher Nolan’s movies in fairness – especially his much-loved yet widely-scrutinised Dark Knight trilogy – but it’s most blatantly apparent in his ingenious 2010 action thriller Inception.

There are two main issues: firstly, Nolan’s usual penchant for excessive expository dialogue is at its absolute worst here. Ellen Page’s Ariadne serves as the audience character to the point that she, in one scene, literally asks another character, “Wait, whose subconscious are we going into exactly?”

From a commercial perspective it was probably a smart idea, to broaden the movie out and make it more easily understood by casuals, but on a storytelling level for those actually paying attention? Not so satisfying, and pretty damn distracting.

The other major issue, as cited by many critics, is the oddly unimaginative nature of the dream worlds.

Ultimately a folding city was the craziest thing in any of the dreamscapes, but as we all know, dreams tend to be far less literal, grounded and logical than Nolan depicts them in the film.

Considering he had $160 million to work with, it’s a shame Nolan didn’t take his own advice and, ahem, “dream a little bigger, darling.”

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